But I Thought “Wireless” Meant…

Free of landlines, free of wires. Right? With WiFi everywhere, it’s so easy to think that being untethered from wires means real freedom. It can be a shock when everything’s suddenly gone, as happened Friday afternoon. No internet, no phone. For over 30 hours. Just because the cables are buried underground, and are fiber-optic instead of copper, that doesn’t mean our ties to the world can’t be disrupted.

A cut cable put nearly the whole county out of touch with the rest of the world. Service would probably be back by 10 pm, someone (with a working phone) reported. The next morning, I was wondering: 10 pm of what day? I finally woke up to a live internet this morning, and phone service came back a couple of hours later. Something tells me the problem was bigger than one cable being cut, but we may never find out.

So what happened to the prep work for NaNo and the ongoing revision of Gift of the Ancien during that down time? There was nothing to interfere with any of that except my mental state, and it did a bang up job. Of course, it didn’t help that I ran into a really rough chapter of Ancien that’s going to require major rejigging, which is almost always one of those jobs I dread with a big dread. So, lots of pacing, reading, just trying to stay on an even keel. I may not be addicted to the internet (which is, in many ways, more important to me than my phone), but being completely isolated from the world certainly messes with my head. If I had my druthers, I’d rather be without a phone than without the web. Being without both? Please. Not ever again.

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4 thoughts on “But I Thought “Wireless” Meant…

  1. Ah, you have actually mananaged to move with the times. I, on the other hand, though I have all the accoutrements of 21st century technology, deep down wish it had never been invented. I liked the struggle for research that no internet provided, I liked not feeling worried if I didn’t check my email every day. ETC.
    I put this down to age in my case, this wishing it would all go away and, as you are roughly the same age as I am, I salute you for having truly embraced the times, rather than merely giving it lip service like me.

  2. I give quite a lot of the new technologies lip service, or no service at all. It’s always pick and choose. That’s why, when the day came that I had to go mobile, I chose a minimal phone. It does have a lot of functions, but the only ones I’m interested in are phone calls and messaging. Maybe the camera, though I wouldn’t miss it if I didn’t have it.

    I’m most grateful to the internet for being able to do much more research than I was ever able to do in the past. I don’t think that should be more of a struggle than absolutely necessary. Now I have resources that would have taken a handful of large libraries to provide.

  3. I agree, as I’m totally reliant on WiFi and find I can’t live without it. Not for social media, although I do spend some of my time on it, but for the instantaneous research facility. When watching tv and my wife says “How old do you think she is”? I have the answer in seconds.:-)

  4. Funny, how we’re thinking about the same thing, but looking at it through a different lens. For me, the computer is primary, and how I get onto the internet is secondary. My internet connection was formerly via cable, now it’s WiFi, as is my phone. I just don’t think about WiFi, as such, as being a major part of my life. I’ve adapted, but my thinking hasn’t — yet. But I guess being totally dependent on WiFi now does bring me smack into the 21st century. A little reluctantly, but change always provokes some initial resistance.

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